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is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons and now lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> have a question about the fiscal cliff? we have answers. our expert explains how going over the fiscal cliff will affect your bottom line. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. with less chronic osteoarth
a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> reporter: they are trying to push forward and march towards the presidential palace. it's a risky move that could cause conflict of supporters of mohammed morsi. the riot police seem to have the protestors bottled up in the square. the goal to march on the presidential palace failed today for the opposition. jenna: the question is whether we are headed toward potentially more violence in the streets. we'll keep an eye on what is happening in the streets today. jon: high levels of a deadly gas forced the evacuation of an elementary school forcing dozen of stud
we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. now some lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> and a toddler taken from the only parents she ever knew because of a little known federal law. now they're fighting to get her back, and may be on their way to the supreme court. i'll talk with them live. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. thanks so much for starting your day with us. it was supposed to be just for laughs. humor. the listeners with a lighthearted prank. two radio deejays called the london hospital where the duchess of cambridge was being treated and tricked a nurse to get details about her condition. two days later, that nurse, 46-year-old jacintha saldanha, took her own life. leaving behind a husband and two children. and now the deejays who played the prank are off the air. >> they have mutually decided that this show will not return until further notice out of res
:00 out west. thanks for starting your day with us. we start with syria and a plan for dealing with the country's chemical weapons. president obama has threatened action if chemical weapons are used, and now we have learned that the pentagon is updating military options for the president. we'll have more on the president's red line and the military options in about ten minutes. >>> belize will have to wait a little longer to question former internet mogul john mcafee about his neighbor's murder. a judge in guatemala says mcafee can remain in the country until his immigration case is heard in court. well, that could take another month. mac afee is recovering after be a apparent collapse. he had been on the run for weeks but insists he has nothing to do with his neighbor's death. >>> charlie crist announced friday on twitter he's officially a democrat. crist spoke at the democratic national convention in september as an independent. he ran for the u.s. senate two years ago as an independent but lost to marco rubio and served as governor of florida as a republican. sum are specula
to state conflict, a conflict between israel and jordan, israel and syria and israel and egypt. this became a new conflict that emerged, one between israel and the palestinians. before 1967, you really didn't hear about the palestinians. it's not by accident a year after the war ended in 1968, the p.l.o., under yasser arafat, emerges as this powerful force in the arab world. we have been living with that as well. 1967 war was also inaugurated the strategic relationship between the united states and israel. people forget that israel fought the 1967 war not with american arms but with french weaponry. france was their principal ally. before 1967, one israeli prime minister one time for one hour had visited the white house. it wasn't israel's founder. june 1964. today ariel sharon or any israeli prime minister comes to washington, it's obvious he will march into the white house. that began that very, very close relationship, that cooperation began in the aftermath of 1967, not before that. >> as you acknowledge, one more book on the six-day war. there have been a lot of them. what do you have
.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments based on intelligence any more than that. megyn: conor powell covering syria life from our mideast bureau tod
>> panic and terror as dozens are killed in central syria. the attack happened as the u.n.'s arab league mediator lakhdar brahimi arrived for more talks. hello. this is al jazeera, live from london. also coming up -- protesters take to the streets in the thousands over a brutal gang rape. after weeks of suspense, mario monti said he will not run for reelection. but he could lead of future italian government. and the head of the u.s. gold lobby goes on -- the u.s. gun lobby goes on television to defend his position that guns should be in every school. and trouble in south africa. hello there. welcome to the program. all they were trying to do was buy bread. it turned into a tragedy in central syria. dozens of people are reported to have died when the bakery they were queuing at was destroyed. the un envoy arrived in syria for more talks. we have this. >> panic, chaos, anger. this is the aftermath of what the opposition says was an air strike carried out by a syrian fighter jet. those killed and wounded were queueing outside a bakery. only five days ago, this area was under the cont
about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see any reason why someone should be able to purchase military style or body armor or weapons. only the police and the military should have that. >> let's start off. you've been giving me a holler on twitter about this. you are a big gun fan. explain to me why bob costas is wrong? >> it boils down to the ability to protect yourself, piers. when you look at what is what happening in syria with the threat of chemical weapons. the only reason they're not going to use it is because someb
in relation to syria. other let's look at the guests and topics making up the rest of the sunday programs. >> good morning. on today's network tv talk shows, the topics include the so-called fiscal cliff and the negotiations between the white house and congress and the situation in the middle east. you could hear all the shows on cspan radio beginning at noon eastern. first is meet the press with senator dick durbin and kevin mccarthy. at 1:00 p.m., pierre abc's of this week with republican senator tom coburn and democratic senator debbie stabenow. the chair like to the house financial services committee, jeb hensarling and congressional progress of caucus co-chair. at 2:00 p.m. is fox news sunday with chris wallace and chuck schumer. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cor
senator mccain will be talking about syria very shortly. do either of you have any thoughts on that? >> i'm coming back >> senators talking about the passage of the russian trade bill, the vote on the floor of the senate a short while ago was 92-4. a look -- the senate continues in session with a vote coming up likely this afternoon, possible vote on the -- we had bep told there was a news conference happening on c-span. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator leeber and senator graham and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines an
of the stability of syria's government came today from a russian diplomat and a nato official, saying the assad regime may be near collapse. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> the democrats are better regarded in this negotiation than the republicans by a lot. >> warner: plus ray >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc g
" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. while i may carry the genes of an irish pub crawler, my chances of becoming an alcoholic are slightly less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major fundi
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
the potential for further unrest in syria, and egypt and across the middle east, it seems to me that that's a question that is really critical as we look at how we continue to provide protection for our personnel on the ground. >> well, senator, first with regard to the specific issue of benghazi. it was addressed in the report. the arb's judgment, there was not enough time to have use military force to respond to make a difference in that situation. but you raise a very good broader question and service on we will be working to with our colleagues and the pentagon and elsewhere in the administration. >> thank you and again the potential for unrest across the middle east i would hope that we would follow up on the specific question because it seems to me critical as we look at the situation going forward. and i will just conclude by adding my personal thanks and appreciation to senator lugar. it has truly been an honor to serve with you, angeli the tremendous legacy for this committee and for the country. thank you. >> senator shaheen, thank you. let me just say that i've thought a lot ab
continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. we may have a problem with that tape and we apologize. we'll try and get it together. if we're not able to -- we're going to go ahead and interview right now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe the situation in syria? >> well, you know i think he went on saying that the syrian government seems to be losing ground in the fighting with the opposition and i think this is obvious. but i don't think there is anything in that statement which one can welcome or not welcome. first of all, that doesn't mean that the trouble will end any time soon. the fighting may continue for a very long time still and the battle may keep going this way or the other way for a long time becaus
are speaking only about foreign policy and in particular in a very focused way on syria. i do want to thank those who made this possible and as chairman of the key subcommittee i value the work that you do, each of you do on a range of policies, whether it is the security of our troops in afghanistan, syria which i will focus on but also the work you do to strengthen our policy as it relates to the regime in iran. your team has brought to the forefront carefully thought out and persuasive research and policy positions that have been an outstanding resource for those of us in congress and i am grateful for that help. i know that the theme of this year's forum is, quote, dictators and dissidents:should the west choose sides? quite topical given the events that have played out most recently whether it is the arabs spring, or nascent democratic openings, i would argue the central question maybe is one of process. that question being whether the u.s. the west should support the democratic process such that citizens are able to choose their own leaders. even when the process gives rise to politic
. >>> growing fears the conflict in syria could soon enter a more horrifying new chapter with possible chemical weapons. we want to talk about what such an attack would mean for the people of syria. the death toll alone according to an estimate could be staggering. we also want to see if this is just hype and given the situation, with u.s. experience in iraq, there's people that think it's loose talk to encourage an intervention in syria. we'll talk to a former cia officer about that and sanjay gupta. plus an activist inside syria and what he has to say about the potential threat, next. i'm doing my own sleep study. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additi
, anderson. >> there are growing fears the conflict in syria could enter an even more horrifying new chapter with possible chemical weapons. we want to talk about what it will mean to the people of syria. the death toll could be staggering. we want to see if this is hype, because given the situation with the u.s. experience in iraq, a lot of people think this is just loose talk trying to encourage some sort of intervention into syria. we're talk it to bob bear about that and also to sanjay gup fa and an activist inside syria and what he has to say about the potential threat next. w-cost in- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550
the opportunity to diverse, talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria, talk about this, that, and so the agenda has to be narrow as a need of focusing on the issue of the principle concern. that's one. that's con accept issue, as far as i can tell was never resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo revails. i suspect, given the fact the issue of a bilateral conversation is a last ditch effort, likely to remain focused. should it be considered a last ditch effort? i don't think so. you talk about years of decision, the year of that, the year of that. we have more time on this issue. it's a paradoxical one. think about it as not having the time, yet, there's always more time. you know, everybody, so this is in 2008, 2009, somehow this issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions before in october 2009, most collectly. if there's a bilateral one to take place, which tends to condition the agenda that's going to be discussed. >> marina, bringing you in on this, ray said we need a sense of modest
escalation in syria's civil war. nato has detected the firing of unguided scud-type missiles. >>> and we're also learning new details of the latest phone call between president obama and house speaker john boehner did not go well. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's long-range rocket launch that's managed to put a satellite in earth's orbit. here's why it is important to all of us. even though north korea is one of the poorest countries and many people are starving there, the korean peninsula is the most tense, most dangerous places on earth. there are roughly one million north korean troops on it is side of the militarize zone separating from south korea. as well as nearly 30,000 u.s. forces. not only are they within strikes distance of the launch site, a long-range rocket shows north korea is on its way to developing technology to launch a rocket at the united states's west coast and hawaii. officials tell cnn that the working assumption is that the north koreans got outside help from others, including iran. so today's launch is raising some huge
to turkey, hillary clinton warns syria against moving its chemical weapons. >> this is a red line for the united states. i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we are would do in the event of credible evidence that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people, but suffice it to say, we are certainly planning to take action if that eventuality were to occur. >> and while washington buzzes over this video tribute to clinton, some are asking is it a farewell to the secretary or prelude to 2016? honoring the icons. politics meets hollywood. a tribute to the arts. president obama finds a way to salute an eclectic group of honor honorees. >> we've got my guy sitting next to dustin hoffman. dave letterman alongside one of the greatest ballerinas of all time. i couldn't think dave dances. there's no smooth transition from ballerina to led skep lin. they redefine the rock and roll lifestyle. we do not have video of this. there was some hotel rooms trashed and mayhem all around. so it's fitting that we're doing this in a room with windows about
deadly plan. >>> as a deadly bloody civil war rages in syria, the opposition gets new support from around the wormed and the united states. what president obama just said. and a look how this crisis figures in the foreign policy challenges mr. obama faces in his section term. that is -- second term. that is next. [shouting] having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. jon: right now some new information on crime stories we're keeping an eye on. police say the man who confessed to murdering an alaska barista also planned to kill her boyfriend. before israel keyes committed suicide in jail he told investigators he new samantha koenig's boyfriend was coming to pick her up from work but he later changed his mind about killing him. police say keyes also confessed to seven other murders across the country but they don't yet know the i.d.'s of his victims. >>> 7-year-old austin sigg is retu
of syria eventually. so we have to be very careful. be part of the settlement, with a gap between what people think about the settlement out of court and the jury-ish community and about the reality. maybe you can tell me, do you know what is the actual percentage of settlement of jewish homes occupying land in judea and samaria? sound settlement, what is actual on the ground that she had occupied the lands? anyone? >> is 3%. i wish it was 50, 90 or 100%. but it's not the case. it is vacant. the idea that the jews cannot leave, because we do not have peace i do not accept it. to date israel with arab israelis, 20% in the week. they live like i live, vote like i vote and nobody tell them if you've not lived there, you have to move out. we have to get to the understanding that it's not about the settlement. it's much deeper than that. [inaudible] >> that is the question? i am 41, ma'am. i do not -- and said what you want. did you get peace? what did it get? [inaudible] >> i think my point is very clear that history has told us we cannot wait and we cannot get to a point when people speak
and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle east, iran's nuclear weapons program, and the absence of an effort to resolve the israeli-palestinian conflict. these are questions and many others that we will have a chance to discuss this weekend. like me, you, i'd just can now wait to get started then that we have a very special guest tonight to get us started. i am very grateful to him for joining us tonight. we have tried for many years to have him join us at the forum. some of you misremember he was here five years ago before he became the foreign minister. since then, we have not had the pleasure for one reason or another. i am grateful that he is going to start us off today than the y today. the leader of th he is now the number two leader of the party and now the foreign minister in the current government of israel. to interview him tonight and to conduct conversations with him before we have a chance to ask him some questions, we are very grateful to robert sieg
syria, secretary panetta said later. he said he invited kim jong-un for dinner, he served him a glass of wine and tried to find out how he thinks. he is clearly a complex man. his accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education, and a little bit of farm labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years, chief of staff to president clinton. he and his wife cut directed the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then president clinton's director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you very much, theresa, for that kind introduction. thank you for the introduction to be here today. i look forward to the opportunity to go back and pick walnuts back in california. told this story before b
. it is a good question. i think the syrians situation is different from the iraq situation. syria reminds me more of the balkans in the 1990's. the internal conflict is horrendous. i think it is different in this respect. not even the syrians want the united states to invade and takeover syria and administrate it. that is not the issue in the case of syria. the issue is whether the united states should supply weapons to factions fighting the regime that are aligned with our interests, and if we do not do this, will the more extreme elements support the radical islamic rebels fighting assad? we want the people to prevail better closer to our interests, yet we are not supporting the materially. reports from serious say there is resentment on this. al qaeda in iraq is now heavily involved in the syrian conflict. one reason is able to do that is we took all our forces out of iraq in 2011. if we had to several thousand forces working with iraqi special operation forces, i believe we could have attenuated the growth of applied it -- of al qaeda in syria. this is a result of the removal of all forc
. another example is syria. there al qaeda in iraq seeks to establish a long-term dream. by fighting alongside the syrian opposition groups the members are working to hijack the longer struggle to suit their own extremist needs. last week we designated on the front of the ail yes, sir of aca i which is already listed as a foreign terrorist terrorist organization. as they try to wrap themselves in the legitimate sei of the we called it a warning to support the opposition to the syrian people and not help the terrorist group. to add to the list of new challenges, in west africa the loosely organized of collection of factions who have some ties to -- public sympathy. the number in sophistication to the attacks increasing and while the group focusing principally on local nigeria issues -- iranian revolutionary guard and teheran's ally hezbollah. in addition to the critical support that hezbollah are providing for serious assad regime, over the past year, there's been a significant escalation in iranian-backed terrorism. hezbollah's activity has reached an tempo unseen since the 1990s wit
to defend turkey against syria. we'll have a live report this morning. >>> ambassador susan rice takes herself out of the running for secretary of state. why did she do it? who will replace hillary clinton? >>> president obama and john boehner meet for 50 minutes, but didn't walk out with a fiscal cliff deal. but they didn't reach a deal, what's next? >>> why are these ukrainian lawmakers throwing punches. glad we're not there. >> not there yet. friday, december 14th. "starting point" begins now. good morning, everybody. our starting point, a developing story about syria's ongoing civil war and a new role for the united states. leon panetta signed an order to send two patriot missile batteries to turkey along with 400 u.s. troops to help the country defend against any u.s. action by syria. the move was expected as the rebellion destabilizes or begins to destabilize the assad regime. nick paton walsh has the latest for us. nick, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. 400 u.s. troops expected to be on the ground, but this contribution of three total member nations, germany expected to
recent power grab. >>> and two days after internet crashed in syria, the coverage wi was restored today. what actually caused it is not clear. but others say it is the work of bashar al-assad's regime. most of those killed in and around syria and aleppo, cnn's arwa damon visited aleppo, and found a nation gripped by civil war. >> reporter: to the tune of jingle bell, a chant in aleppo, with original lyrics. hand in hand, we are all hand in hand, they say, until we get rid of assad. the overwhelming crowd here, for democracy, but also some carrying black flags for islamists. let's agree that each has a right to their perspective. a show of unity, but later islamist groups take up their own chant. the people want an islamic state. when we say we want an islamic state, it means that every citizen will have their rights, he says. islam respects the rights of others, but according to their interpretation. one says, i should cover my hair. twenty-five-year-old hussain says he is not worried they will take over the country. syria is beautiful, a nation of many colors, he says, whether they lik
intelligence officials have a large-scale terror plots in october and into syria, where the reports yesterday of chemical weapons being moved. i'm increasingly worried the terrorists may have programs by turkey, jordan or other countries where persons may fully to escape the bloodshed. it is imperative the interagency security screening process for all refugees be formidable incredible. the purpose of this hearing is to identify any remaining gaps in the security screening process they need to be remedied in to ensure that dhs and the state department had the necessary tools and resources at their disposal to deal to carry out the necessary security checks. it is concerning to me that either of the iraqi refugees arrested last year had worked for any u.s. military diplomatic or nongovernmental organization in iraq. get both receive refugee status based on humanitarian reasons. all this being said, i am glad that the agency security screening and adjudication process for refugees has undergone and continues to undergo a number of enhancements since it was initiated. in particular that's a call
are seeing them play a more active and positive role in international diplomacy. in syria we have work to do. you see where we are headed with respect to styria based on secretary clinton's recent comments but china is strategic, china has strong interest in managing its ascension as a global power, not the only rising power in the neighborhood. it is something that we share. we believe both we, the united states, and the community of democracies have the ability to strategically put that together and do it based on the first two principles and partnerships. >> we just don't have a large advertising campaign. i just want to comment on china's syria plan. it has nothing to do with syria which is quite a separate issue. it has everything to do with wounding a america. this -- china and russia have got together and overtures were sent to delhi to send some sort of needlework if you want to use that word and india thankfully has resisted and keeps its options more nuanced and flexible. china's natural game, dr. kissinger has three chapters in his book. the interesting thing about that game is it
. >> brian todd is there in north pennsylvania for us. thank you. >>> turning to syria, the united states insists that the rebel group is is a terrorist will not weaken the regime. sanctions were slapped on the leader of the group only hours after it was back listed by the state department. our senior international correspondent arwa damon is inside syria with an extraordinary look at one rebel fighting the battle with an exclusive homemade recipe. >> reporter: with the precision of a master chef, he adjusts the flame. in the pan, table sugar and a chemical compound bought locally that we've agreed not to name. it's almost ready, he says, as the color darkens. he doesn't want his face shown. he has decades of experience in the art of war. he says he fought with the palestinians twice by the israelis in the 1980s. but they had more mercy than the assad regime. he adds bitterly. now he's using his training and weapons design that he got in libya. this amount combined with another substance is what he uses to make a single grenade. when it comes to making the prop pell lants for a rocket, it
be signing on to a worldwide treaty with countries like syria and iran, in which would water down our right to bare arms. >> i noticed there was a spike in gun sales after the election, why is that? >> well, because of those things and president obama's history and the first term of regulations and executive orders, things like that to try to restrict guns, so, people are want to get guns and may be restricted and worried about government having guns and they reported that black friday was the single biggest sale of firearms in the history this have country and november was the single biggest for gun sales. >> mike: over the last 11 months in this country a new study came out. 2.5 million times in in country over the last 11 months, crimes have been prevented because of guns. >> where does the anti-gun group get it wrong? >> it was exactly, bob costas said. i think he actually said on this network, that guns always make situations more dangerous and saying things like that is just factually incorrect. and there are 30,000 people possibly every year killed with a firearm and exactly like yo
consensus is growing that syria's president's days are numbered. russia now joining in. could stronger laws have prevented that gun violence in oregon? we'll talk to brady campaign president dan gross. andrea mitchell reports is next right here. gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone...but her likes 50% more cash. but i'm upping my game. do you want a candy cane? yes! do you want the puppy? yes! do you want a tricycle? yes! do you want 50 percent more cash? no! ♪ festive. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. what's in your wallet? but some things never get old... marie callender's dutch apple pie with fresh fuji apples and a crust made from scratch... it makes home at the holidays even sweeter. marie callender's. it's time to savor. we create easy-to-use, powerful trading tools for all. look at these streaming charts! they're totally customizable and they let you visualize what might happen next. that's
is making plans to evacuate thousands of russian citizens from syria. the fallout of assad would also be a huge blow to his other allies, iran and the terror group hezbollah. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt live in our new york city newsroom now. jonathan, this change of tone from the hutions seems to be very significant. >> yeah it, certainly is. because russia remember has been president bashar assad's greatest ally and protecter. if they are changing their tone now, accepting that the rebels are getting closer and closer to assad's power center in damascus through the violence that we have seen intensifying over the last couple of weeks, it signifies that the russians are realizing that their greatest friend in the middle east is about to be out of power and they better pretty quickly start making some new friends among the rebel opposition. officials say they are simply pleased to see the russians finally facing up to reality, listen. >> we agree that assad will not be a part of syrians future. we have noted as the media has the progress that the opposition has been
whether it's with the chinese or the russians or whether it's on syria or whether it's on the israeli/palestinian peace process. presidential freedom of action has narrowed to a degree that it is very difficult for america to assert itself. i think it's really a scandalous example of this growing kind of -- well, not growing -- but of this on the horizon with the u.n. vote. the united states' founding member, the key player in founding the u.n., we were heavily engaged, right or wrong, in trying to prevent the vote on the palestinian quasi-membership in the u.n. we opposed it. we and the israelis. 188 countries voted. how many voted with us? >> nine? >> eight. that tells you something. that's a perfect you've writte foreign policy, an article on foreign policy, talking about how the president seizes the initiative back. how does he do it in this case where obviously he believes, susan rice said she believed, that this was actually a step back for peace having this vote for the palestinians? >> well, first of all, that's a question of judgment whether they really believed it or not, b
is the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan and bahrain and syria. the agenda has remained narrow as a means of focusing the issue of our principal concern, namely proliferation. the second school of thought suggests the agenda is broader and perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the debt -- disagreements of the nuclear issue. as far as i can tell, that has never been resolved. when an issue remains not result, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of the bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we always talk about the year of this or the year of that. we always think of it as not having enough time. yet there is always more this issue seems a degree of time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before. i suspect there is a bilateral conversation that it will attend the discussion. said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty about what we hope to achieve. i would be interested to hear what yo
afghanistan, to syria to iran to north carolina we also must recognize -- north korea we also must recognize the regimes that threaten the united states and allies. therefore we must ensure our military is sufficiently resourced and that our national leaders priretize our resources towards efforts that are appropriate for the u.s. military and our national vite al security interests. i look forward to learning more toobt situation on the ground as well as what the u.s. government is doing to address the situation in the drc. mr. smith. >> thank you, mr. president. i thank you very u much for holding this hearing. this is a very important issue. as you described the situation in the eastern drc is dire. it's the largest humanitarian crisis that too few people have herd of. in some estimation over the course of the last 15 to 20 years now nearly 5 million people have been killed many more wounded injured raped displaced. it is a place where a lot of people are suffering. and it is a place where i believe we can make a difference in helping to reduce that suffering. stability in the region is i
the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan or by iran or syria. they say the agenda has to remain narrow as a means of focusing issue on our principal concern which is proliferation. the second school of thought suggests if the agenda is broader, perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the agreements on the nuclear issue. that particular concept has never been resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered as a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we talk about years of decision. i think we have more time on this issue. we always think of the issue as not having enough time and being urgent but somehow there is always more time. in 2008, this issue was important and it had an urgency but it has time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before also in 2009. if there is a bilateral discussion [inaudible] >> marina, ray said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty a
. another example is syria. al qaeda and iraq seeks to establish a long-term presence under the pseudonym. they fighting alongside armed syrian opposition groups from the members are working to hijack a long repressed nations struggle to suit their own extremist needs. last week redesignated an alias at aqa, which is already of course listed at foreign terrorist organizations. as they wrap themselves in legitimacy of the opposition, we called terrorists out of a warning to all who wish to support the opposition to the syrian people and not help a terrorist group put down roots. to add to this list of new challenges in west africa was a nice collection of mrs. booker rob continue to carry at attacks in nigeria from exporting agreements in northern nature as to when recruits and public sympathy. the number and sophistication is increasing and while the group focuses on nigerian issues that are scum at every port is developing financial with other extremists and rushes to operate on a bigger stage. at this point i need to make something of a detour because while nonstate actors such as al qa
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